Monthly Archives: October 2010

SAVE THE TA-TAS ALL WOMEN WINEMAKER TASTING TO BENFIT MAMMOGRAPHY

SAVE THE TATAS!

ALL WOMEN WINEMAKER TASTING

AT WOLFE’S WINE SHOPPE

TO BENEFIT MAMMOGRAPHY FOR THOSE WHO CAN’T AFFORD SCREENING

 

FRIDAY OCTOBER 29  7-9PM

$20 w/RSVP $30 at the Door!

In Conjunction with Wellness Community of Miami

RSVP TO Jeffrey@wolfeswines.com or go “Old School” and Call 305-445-4567 or tweet @wolfeswines

WINES TO BE TASTED:

Patty Green Cellars, Domaine Lafage, Honig, Cote Bonneville, Peay, Domaine Marcoux Paolo Scavino

 


Punta Crena-Paolo Ruffino & Villa di Geggiano-Andrea Boscu at Wolfe’s

 

WINEMAKERS PAOLO RUFFINO OF PUNTA CRENA &

ANDREA BOSCU FROM VILLA di GEGGIANO

 

AT WOLFE’S WINE SHOPPE

FRIDAY OCTOBER 15th 7-9PM

Wolfe’s Wine Shoppe has been a long time supporter of the imports of Kermit Lynch.  Much of my love came from my first “kiss the dirt visit” to France to meet many of his growers with the National Sales Director Bruce Neyers back in 1996.  Having lunch with Lulu Peryaud, Kermit himself, Bruce and about 10 other wine professional from around the country at Domaine Tempier was the nail in the coffin for me.  I was sold, a cult follower, I took all his medicine and my tongue danced with anticipation anytime a new release was offered or he picked up a new grower.  Names like Daniel Brunier, Aubert Villaine, Marcel Lapierrre, Olivier Humbrecht and Lucien Peryaud became household names at Wolfe’s.  So over the years Kermit was not only focusing on French winemakers, but an affinity with Italy arose and he has amassed a steller group of growers that are developing names just like their idols in France.  However, the Itlaian portfolio was a pariah of sorts in South Florida and for years distributors were gun-shy to pick up the wines…why you ask?, because you know that when you see a Kermit Lynch Imports on the back of a bottle you know the wine will be great no matter what part of France it’s from.  The simple answer is that it takes work to penetrate the market with new wines, especially esoteric wines and regions that wine drinkers are not familiar with…so out of fear & laziness the wines have not been here…..that’s until now.   Florida Wine Company took on the challenge and is doing a great job with the wines.  Of course Wolfe’s Wine Shoppe was there from the beginning so it is with great pleasure that we welcome two growers from Kermit’s Italian Portfolio this Friday.

  WINES TO BE TASTED:

Punta Crena Wines

Pettirosso 2009 Ca da Rena Pigato 2008 Vermentino 2008 Reine Mataossu 2008 Cruvin 2009 Rossese 2008

Villa di Gegginao Wines

Brandinello, IGT 2007 Chianti Classico 2007 Chianti Classico Reserva 2006

A LITTLE BIT ABOUT GEGGIANO:

Villa di Geggiano is located in Pianella, just a few miles outside of Siena. Originally built in the 13th century and renovated in 1780, Villa di Geggiano has been home to the Bianchi Bandinelli family since 1527. Now run by two brothers, Andrea handles the administrative affairs of the domaine, and Alessandro works in the cellar, but they make the most important vinification decisions together. They began to bottle their wine under their own label in 1989.

The domaine has about 6 hectares, planted with 80% Sangiovese and 20% Cabernet Sauvignon. On average, the vines are 16 years old. There is also 1 hectare planted with 25-year-old vines of both Ciliegiolo and Malvasia Nera. The domaine bottles about 2100 cases of Chianti a year, selling off the balance of their grapes to negociants.

Villa di Geggiano produces 2 Chianti, Chianti Classico and Chianti Classico “Riserva”, 95-97% Sangiovese, 3-5% Cabernet Sauvignon. Fermentation for both wines is about 2 weeks in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks, with periodic rain-like pumping over the must. After 14 to16 months in Allier oak barrels, the wines are blended and the Classico is bottled. The Classico “Riserva” then spends another year in barrel before bottling.

The Bianchi Bandinelli brothers also bottle a third cuvée, the Fattoria di Geggianello Rossa di Toscana IGT. This wine is comprised of 90% Sangiovese, and 10% Ciliegiolo and Malvasia

A LITTLE BIT ABOUT PUNTA CRENA:

Punta Crena is in the tiny town of Varigotti, Italy, right on the ocean in the wine-producing region of Liguria. The Ruffino family is famous in their hometown but little known elsewhere, even in Italy. They’ve been making wine in Varigotti since 1500! From the first sniff I was hooked on their delicious wines, made traditionally from indigenous grapes, wines with typicity and character but without a hint of pretension. These are exactly the kind of wines you’ve been seeking for a long time, country quaffers from the Ligurian coast. You might have wondered what “Punta Crena” means. In Italian, Punta means “point.” In this case, it refers to the “point” that is a landform-a peninsula.  Crena is simply a name and has no meaning in Italian or the local Ligurian dialect. 

A


CALERA PINOT NOIRS w/ JOSH JENSEN

In 1971 Josh Jensen found an old limestone quarry high in the Gavilan Mountains on the side of a peak named Mount Harlan, about 30 miles south of the town of Hollister. He bought 324 acres, and planted a few acres of Pinot Noir, before he had electricity, running water, or even a proper road to the property. He named his winery Calera, Spanish for lime kiln, the remains of which he found on the property, and eventually restored. The first few years were hard going, but eventually, in 1978, Jensen harvested his first couple of barrels of Pinot Noir and has never looked back.

Over the past three decades, few winemakers in California could possibly compete with Jensen for fidelity to an original vision of what kind of wine they wanted to make. In those three decades, the only concession to modernity that Jensen has allowed is the addition of a mechanical crusher-destemmer to his operation. Apart from that he continues to make Pinot Noir the way he learned to in Burgundy: perfectly ripe, meticulously farmed grapes; whole cluster fermentation with native yeasts in small vats, punched down by hand; aging for at least 16 months, in French oak (of which only about 30% is new) and then bottling without any filtration.

In 1990 Jensen’s patch of limestone (and about 7000 acres surrounding it) were granted the status of being an American Viticultural Area, but by then most people who cared about California Pinot Noir already had heard of the winemaker up on the mountain who was making some of the best Pinot Noir to be found outside of Burgundy.

Remarkably, that is still true today. Calera’s single vineyard Pinot Noirs are some of the best around, yet more so than any other wine of their caliber, they are reasonably easy to find, and priced within the reach of mere mortals — something to do with the fact that they don’t have the words Sonoma or Napa anywhere on the label.

Before the 2007’s arrive and are gobbled up based on the press here are two 2006’s that will please you in the short term or for the cellar.  Both the wines received great praise from Allen Medows 92pts.

Calera Mills 2006-An ultra pure, airy and cool nose of extract of red pinot fruit trimmed in overt floral nuances a hint of vegetal that, like the Ryan, adds depth rather than any sense of greenness. The purity of the nose continues onto the detailed, intense and delicious yet entirely serious medium-bodied flavors that possess fine depth and excellent length. This is an impeccably balanced wine of elegance and understatement that is classically styled.                                  

Calera Jensen 2006-This required several hours of aeration to reluctantly emerge from its youthful shell but when it did the elegant and very pure aromas of floral, red berry and spice hints formed the perfect complement to the intense, detailed, complex and refined medium-bodied flavors that possess lovely precision and excellent inner mouth perfume that lingers and lingers. Moreover, this appears to be allowing only glimpses as to the ultimate quality as this is very much a baby. Great potential